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Thread: Faber steel 120s

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    Registered Users Sarah's Avatar
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    Default Faber steel 120s

    I own a Faber steel 120 and a Faber high pressure tank that is an 80.

    I hear in Italy they use the same exact tanks to 4000 psi and I hear in Florida they crank up the pressure too.

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    Well you hear correct. PS---my comment was you 'hear correct...in jest' of course....FOLLOW tank specs!!!!
    Last edited by texdiveguy; 01-19-2007 at 03:18 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iDiveChick View Post
    I own a Faber steel 120 and a Faber high pressure tank that is an 80.

    I hear in Italy they use the same exact tanks to 4000 psi and I hear in Florida they crank up the pressure too.
    What you are hearing is urban legends.

    Faber manufactures more than 80 different scuba cylinders that are distributed in more than 20 countries. Each country has its own specifications. As such each cylinder series has it's own specifications that it must meet. If your cylinder is a 2400 psi with 10% plus it is just as it is stamped. A cylinder in Europe that is manufactured to 232 bar or 280 bar or 300 bar is just that a specific cylinder.

    While folks here in the states like to believe that they can do whatever they like with cylinders and "assume" certain things about a cylinder for the most part they are just wrong.

    Having sold more than 100,000 faber cylinders over the years I know my data and information is correct.

    Cheers
    Joel Silverstein, VP COO
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    Registered Users Zero's Avatar
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    Ever seen a tank go pop or one that has? Not a pretty site and i wouldnt want to be around when it goes. Kinda turns you off asking for big fills. I dont know about the rest of the world but our tanks in Oz have to have burst disks and they are a life saver. When they go they scare the sh*t out of everyone around and spray water out of the tub all over the place but most of the time no ones lost a limb or life. I have seen the results of an overfilled tank that was left in a shop that got hit by the afternoon sun. Burst disk blew and the tank went through the glass doors it was next to. No one got hurt and it caused a bit of damage but still way less than the tank going off.

    Matt

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    Quote Originally Posted by JS1scuba View Post
    What you are hearing is urban legends.

    Faber manufactures more than 80 different scuba cylinders that are distributed in more than 20 countries. Each country has its own specifications. As such each cylinder series has it's own specifications that it must meet. If your cylinder is a 2400 psi with 10% plus it is just as it is stamped. A cylinder in Europe that is manufactured to 232 bar or 280 bar or 300 bar is just that a specific cylinder.

    While folks here in the states like to believe that they can do whatever they like with cylinders and "assume" certain things about a cylinder for the most part they are just wrong.

    Having sold more than 100,000 faber cylinders over the years I know my data and information is correct.

    Cheers
    Do you have any manufacturers data that show this to be true Joel? If so, would it be possible to obtain a copy? I have asked several experts and the answers are always either as you have posted here or else they claim there is no real difference in the alloy or the processing; so far none have been able to back up their claims with factual data though. FWIW, I regualrly make use of cave fills in my Faber steels and to date have yet to experience any problems (I never leave them stored with excessives pressures); cylinders have been retested and passed hydros. I would really love to see some factual data from the manufacturers showing the differences if any exist. Just trying to be better informed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zero View Post
    I have seen the results of an overfilled tank that was left in a shop that got hit by the afternoon sun. Burst disk blew and the tank went through the glass doors it was next to. No one got hurt and it caused a bit of damage but still way less than the tank going off.

    Matt
    My question is what would have happened if the tank didnt have a burst disk. My guess would be.....nothing.

    It takes a doubling of ABSOLUTE temp to double the pressure in a tank.
    So if the tank had 300bar in it from an over fill at 20degC the tank would have to reach 180deg C or so to get to 400bar. I very much doubt a good condition tank would rupture at 400bar. I also doubt it would pass to many more hydros.
    My understanding of burst disks is that there were more designed for liquified gas cylinders and for protection from tanks in fires. Europe do not use them for scuba.

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    I have several Faber LP 120's that I regularly overfill, and have never had a problem, I have filled them to 3800 psi.

    I have friends that have Fabers that get filled to 4200 psi, and never had a problem.

    The tanks are tested to 10,000 cycles at 4,000 Psi before failure, I seriously doubt anyone is going to ever fill a tank anywhere near 10,000 times.

    The tanks when they are cycled are done hydraulically, and very quickly, which I think would cause more stress in them.

    The greatest chance of a tank failure is when it is being filled (that is why I have my wife fill my tanks ), so I can't see anything wrong with a dive shop not wanting to overfill a tank.

    I would never, never, never overfill an aluminum tank.

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